Fall has Arrived on the Bighorn

Fall has Arrived on the Bighorn

October 26, 2014 7:20 am Published by Leave your thoughts

It seems that our Indian Summer has finally come to an end here on the Bighorn. The mornings are colder, nights are approaching fast, and the majority of cottonwoods look like mere skeletons with a few still holding on to what little foliage is left. Fishing pressure has been slowing down, with the majority of anglers now arriving on the weekends. Looking ahead on the weekly forecast we are expected to receive fairly nice weather. There is a chance that we will receive a few days of precipitation, which is not all bad, especially for those who are itching to throw streamers on those overcast days.

Dean with a healthy fall brown

Dean with a healthy fall brown

On October 22nd the Reclamation dropped the river from 3,250 cfs down to 2,980 cfs in order to conserve water storage. Many anglers that paid visit to the shop are surprised to hear that the river is flowing at 2,980, and feel that the flows are much higher. This is due to the grass, and as a result has displaced water up to around 1000 cfs, therefore making the river seem to be more in the area of 3,900 cfs. Though the water may seem high, the river is still easily accessible. The big question that weighs heavy on everyone’s mind is the consistency of the fishing. With the water clarity off, fish are still actively in search of food and chasing anything that is in their territory, although there is work involved in order to achieve numbers. Nymphing remains to be steady, and requires a longer leader (8-9ft from indicator to split shot) from the boat. Fish are stacked up in the deep runs, and having a deep nymph rig will be the ticket to success. Wade fishing has by far been the most productive. It is important when wade fishing to cover as much water as possible, and hit every run or seam that seems plausible. The suggested nymphing patterns are as followed-Ray Charles (Tan, Grey, and Pink 16-18), Orange Scuds (12-14), San Juan Worms (Red, Brown, Wine (8-10), Pseudo Wondernymph (18-20), Tungteasers (18-20), Red Midge Larva (18-20), and the Rainbow Warrior (18-20).

Streamer fishing has been the main focus of attention for many anglers this past month. Fishing them both on and off of the banks has been effective. Weeds have been an issue along the edges, and expect to catch a few bits and pieces of salad along the way. Having heavy grain sink tips such as the Rio DC, and Orvis Depth Charge are working well for fish located in the center. The long heads will benefit you and keep the fly in the strike zone for an extended period of time. It is crucial to allow your bugs to fall to the bottom before beginning your retrieve. Experiment with an array of different colors and sizes when it comes to choosing a pattern.

Need Streamers? We have what you need!

Need Streamers? We have what you need!

As for the dry fly fishing we have been noticing a great number of pseudos in the afternoon. Keep in search of rising pods, and have an array of different patterns ranging in sizes 18-22 on hand. As for Tricos there are still a few to be spotted, but are rapidly declining and will soon be over. Patterns such as the Cdc Biot Dun (18-22), Parachute Adams (18-22), Cdc Para Spinner (Rust, Olive, and Black 18-22), Sipper Emerger (18-20), and the Cdc Thorax Dun (18-20) have all been rewarding.

 

 

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This post was written by Bighornangler

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