Spring has made it to the Bighorn

Spring has made it to the Bighorn

March 17, 2014 7:00 am Published by Leave your thoughts

Well the snow is melted and the sun is shining, therefore we are declaring it officially spring here on the Bighorn. We have had weather that can only be described as exceptional, as temperatures have been reaching into the high 40’s and all the way into the low 60’s. If your boat and other fishing gear is still stowed in winter storage, then now is the time to dust it off and head on down to the Bighorn. We are expected to receive great weather for this entire week, with the possibility of a few minor rain showers along the way.

We have been getting calls recently concerning the bump in water flows, as the Bighorn is currently flowing at 4,990 cfs, and is predicted to reach up to 6000 cfs early this week. The Reservoir is currently 89.9% full, and is showing inflows reaching to nearly 8,400 cfs. With this increase in flows it has pushed out the majority of what was left for grass, and many anglers have had no issues with grass catching on their flies. Once the flows are bumped up to 6000 cfs nymph fishing, and streamer fishing will still remain very effective. Midges and sowbugs continue to catch fish consistently, as have a variety of different streamer patterns.

Anglers getting the first taste of spring weather

Anglers getting the first taste of spring weather

As for baetis there has been very little to appear on the water. We headed down to 3 mile access the other night as the wind was rather calm, and did notice a very small amount lingering here and there, and are still being dominated by midges. Patterns that have been working well for baetis nymphs have been the juju, quill nymph, and also the wonder nymph in sizes 18-20. As we have not been seeing much activity on the surface, below the surface is a different story. We still would recommend that you keep your baetis dry fly patterns close by, just in case. Midge patters such as the griffiths gnat, and the cdc transitional midge have been rather effective.

As for nymphing, sowbug patterns such as the Ray Charles in colors pink, grey, and tan are all working well, as are those with a firebead. Midge patters such as the zebra, cream and red midge larva, and the rootbeer have been working great trailed behind a scud or sowbug. As for streamers patterns we have been experimenting with a variety of different colors, and have been changing up our retrieve as much as we can. Sink tips are the key in the slow deep pools, and in the middle of the river flats.   BV

 

Callon Wink teaching the Sweetwater Guide school how to tie a dry

Callon Wink teaching the Sweetwater Guide school how to tie a dry

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This post was written by Bighornangler

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