Summer Fishing Continues into September

Summer Fishing Continues into September

September 4, 2013 10:15 am Published by 2 Comments
Hooked Up

Hooked Up

Black caddis made their most prominent appearance of the season yesterday.  The emergence started late morning and last well into the afternoon and evening.  Bwo’s and pseudos continue to be present especially on the upper half of the river.

Water temperatures on the lower river were ideal yesterday in the mid to upper 60’s for both the fish and the insects.  The fish were hot after being hooked on yellow sallies, black caddis, tricos, pmd’s, tan caddis and ants.  With the water temp’s falling within the ideal range, a smattering of a wide variety of insects were present.

Dill’s CDC Dun, Rusty Paraspinners ants continue to catch fish river wide. When a more prominent hatch of psuedos or black caddis are present go to more exacting imitations.

Streamers have also produced a few excellent days of fishing as of late, but it’s day to day so give em hell and see what happens.  If it doesn’t pay off pretty quickly, probably best to turn back to the nymphs for sub surface action.

Nymphing has been steady as always. With the cold water we have experienced all season we do not have any of the large mats of grass that we typically contend with this time of the year.  Sowbugs with a small mayfly nymph or a black caddis pupa are getting it done consistently.

Charlie with a monster brown that ate a caddis dry

Charlie with a monster brown that ate a caddis dry

Rainbow ready for release

Rainbow ready for release

 

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This post was written by Bighornangler

2 Comments

  • Dennis Worwa says:

    Thinking about early October.
    Generally speaking, what is the weather and fishing like?
    Thanks
    Dennis

    • mtangler says:

      Early October is still very moderate weather. Colder evenings days in the low 60’s or 50’s. Small dries and streamer fishing is really good that time of year. Nymphing is always good and this year we don’t have much weed growth in the river.

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